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Newsletter

logo.jpgVeterinary Associates Stonefield is committed to providing today's Pets and there owners knowledge for maintain a healthy long life. We have provided you with information in this newsletter that can benefit your pet, someone you knows' pet and even yourself. We thank you very much for taking the time to read this valuable information and hope you enjoy more to come. Don't forget to schedule your pet's Annual exam; they will thank you for it.

Call Today (502) 245-7863 

June 2012 Newsletter. Protecting your pets against Flea's and Ticks

Lyme disease & Your Pets

Lyme disease is a top concern for dog owners who enjoy walking with their dog in grassy and wooded areas. Transmitted by deer ticks, Lyme disease can result in fever, joint lameness, fatigue, and general discomfort for your pet. While treatment is available

Did You Know?

Lyme disease was first discovered in the town of Lyme, Connecticut, hence its name.

One of the best ways to dispose of ticks is to take an old medication container (the kind you get from the pharmacy) and put a little rubbing alcohol inside. Add the tick to the bottle once it has been removed. It is the right size for what you are doing and the lid is tight when capped. Then dispose of it.

How to PrevĀ­ent and Remove Ticks

Lyme disease is a top concern for dog owners who enjoy walking with their dog in grassy and wooded areas. Transmitted by deer ticks, Lyme disease can result in fever, joint lameness, fatigue, and general discomfort for your pet. While treatment is available, Lyme disease is best prevented. Here is how to prevent Lyme disease and remove troublesome ticks.

Prevention Tips:

Ask our Veterinarians about providing your pets with the means to fight Lymes Disease. We now carry a Lymes Disease Vaccine for your pet's safety.

Try to avoid heavily wooded areas or tall grass when walking your pet.

Always be sure you check for ticks as soon as you are done with your walk. Make a point to investigate everyone in the family before returning to the car after a hike.

Be thorough when looking for ticks. Check in places your pet cannot get at such as the back of the head and neck. Ticks will tend to bury themselves in areas pets cannot reach.

Remove any tick(s) you find promptly and dispose of them properly. Proper disposal means killing the tick before disposing of it in a secured trash can.

Use a topical formula such as Frontline to help keep ticks from "digging in" to your pet. Frontline is a topical formula developed in France for children with head lice. Knowing it was developed for humans should make you feel comfortable about putting it on your pet. Apply the product to the back of the neck where the pet cannot lick it off or get its paw up to scratch and then lick and ingest.

We can help you put this on or show you the first time. There are also instructions in the package. It is easy to apply and should be applied monthly. Frontline does not allow the tick to penetrate the skin. Instead, it kills the tick and the tick falls off.

Instructions for Removing a Tick:

If you find a tick on your pet, get a pair of fine-nosed tweezers to remove it. Wash the tweezers with warm, soapy water before and after use. Wash your hands as well.

Have someone hold your pet so they do not get distracted and move on you.

Grasp the head of the tick as close to the skin as possible. Do not squeeze the body of the tick! You want the nose, not the body.

Pull the tick straight out. You may have to be firm when you pull. This is okay and should not hurt your pet.

Put the tick into a small jar of rubbing alcohol (to kill it). You can also flush the tick, or run it through the garbage disposal with hot water.

Rub the area with rubbing alcohol to kill germs, and petroleum jelly (if it is not in an area where your pet will lick it off) to sooth the area.

If you notice a rash or anything red, blotchy, itchy, etc., make an appointment to have your pet checked. A fever, sudden joint lameness, fatigue, and not eating are other signs it is time to give us a call!

Fleas, the Frustrating Pest

Consider the following scenario: You arrive home from a long flight from a wonderful, two-week vacation. As you drive home, you remind yourself the boarding kennel is already closed and you have to wait until tomorrow to pick up your dog, Max. You fine

puppyscratching12.1.jpg

Adult Flea Treatments

-Trifexus for dogs
-Advantage for dogs and cats
-Revolution for cats
-Comfortis for dogs
-Capstar for dogs and cats

Examples of drugs for treating flea eggs and larvae:
-Methoprene
-Lufenuron
-Pyriproxifen

Outdoor treatment:
-Bayer Advanced Garden Multi Insect Killer (cyfluthrin)

Also, most fleas in the US are resistant to Pyrethrins.

Consider the following scenario: You arrive home from a long flight from a wonderful, two-week vacation. As you drive home, you remind yourself the boarding kennel is already closed and you have to wait until tomorrow to pick up your dog, Max. You finally walk in the front door, happy to be home. As you walk across the carpet, you feel a tingling sensation on your legs and when you look down, you see your white socks now look gray. FLEAS!

Some people's reaction to the above would be to banish the dog from the house and to call the exterminator. Both reactions would be wrong - neither would help to rid the house of fleas. Why? In order to appreciate, you must have a basic understanding of the different stages of fleas, such as their life cycle, and know which chemicals kill which stages, if any!

There are four stages of a flea's life: egg, larva, pupa, adult. Only adult fleas are on the pet, the other stages are in the environment. The female fleas on the dog lay eggs that roll off onto the carpet, bedding, floors, grass, etc. In one to six days, the eggs hatch to larvae that can crawl. In five to 11 days, the larvae change to pupae. Unfortunately, there is no chemical or substance that can kill flea pupae other than fire. Even worse, the pupae have the ability to go into "suspended animation" and just stay in this state until a host appears. We know this state can last at least one year. Once a host comes, close, certain stimuli cause the pupae to hatch to adults that immediately hop onto the host, which in this case, is either your pet or you!

Should you banish "Max" to the backyard? No! If there is no pet in the house, the fleas in the house will simply go to you to live and feed. You need Max to act as "bait". A good adult flea treatment should be used on Max. Your veterinarian can advise you on such products. Since you have been gone for two weeks, all the fleas in the house (before you entered) were in the pupae stage. Therefore, any chemical an exterminator would use would be useless. Once a host enters the area, the fleas immediately hatch and go to the host, so any residual chemical in the carpet is also useless; the fleas are not exposed long enough to be killed. Premise sprays take 36 to 48 hours to kill fleas. You have to treat adult fleas by treating the pet. The best flea control involves treating all the stages possible and stopping egg production. Drugs that kill eggs and larvae are added to some adult topical treatments or are available separately. Your veterinarian is the best source of information on integrated flea treatment.

Call Today, and ask us what can we do to protect your family.

Veterinary Associates Stonefield

203 Moser Rd. Louisville, Ky. 40223

(502) 245-7863

All new clients recieve $25 off there first visit with internet website coupon. Click here for coupon.

Call Today for your next appointment

Veterinary Associates Stonefield

203 Moser Rd.

Louisville, Ky. 40223

(502) 245-7863

Exclusive Offer

New Patients Receive $25 Off on their first visit.

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